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Honors Economics

1 Semester, 1 Credit Grades Available: 12

Prerequisite:  B- average in Honors U.S. History or an A- average U.S. History.  

This fast-paced honors course will introduce you to the basics behind micro and macroeconomics. Microeconomics involves the study of economic principles, such as supply & demand, pricing, marketing, business & labor, and personal finance as they relate to the individual and private industry. Macroeconomics involves the study of economic principles such as gross domestic product & growth, taxes & government spending, and international trade as they relate to the economy of the United States and other global economies. An emphasis will be placed on high-level reading and writing assignments as well as document/resource question analysis. It necessitates critical thinking skills through class participation in discussion and group activities. By analyzing economic markets, models, systems, and terms students will begin to understand the economic way of thinking. Additionally, students will study business and investment, the role of the government in the economy, and performance indicators used to evaluate the health of the economy.

Ethnic Studies

1 Semester, 1 Credit Grades Available: 9, 10, 11, 12

Ethnic Studies provides opportunities to broaden students’ perspectives concerning lifestyles and cultural patterns of ethnic groups in the United States.  This course will either focus on a particular ethnic group or groups, or use a comparative approach to the study of patterns of cultural development, immigration, and assimilation, as well as the contributions of specific ethnic or cultural groups.  The course may also include an analysis of the political impact of ethnic diversity in the United States.

Indiana Studies

1 Semester, 1 Credit Grades Available: 9, 10, 11, 12

Indiana Studies is an integrated course that compares and contrasts state and national developments in the areas of politics, economics, history, and culture.  The course uses Indiana history as a basis for understanding current policies, practices, and state legislative procedures. It also includes the study of state and national constitutions from a historical perspective and as a current foundation of government.  Examination of individual leaders and their roles in a democratic society will be included and students will examine the participation of citizens in the political process. Selections from Indiana arts and literature may also be analyzed for insights into historical events and cultural expressions.

Theology 1-2

2 Semesters, 2 Credits Grades Available: 9

Semester 1: Revelation and Scripture: The Revelation of Jesus Christ in Sacred Scripture is designed to introduce students to the nature and formation of Sacred Scripture, to familiarize them with its structure, to enable them to read and interpret it according to the mind of the Church, and to identify Jesus Christ foretold and fulfilled.

Semester 2: Christology: This course answers the question of who Christ is both in terms of His Humanity and Divinity, as well as through His identity as the Second Person of the Holy Trinity, the Word Made Flesh.  Students are introduced to Christ as the fullest and most perfect Revelation of God and they begin to understand and evaluate the implications of being a follower of Christ.

Theology 3-4

2 Semesters, 2 Credits Grades Available: 10

Semester 1: The Paschal Mystery: Centered on the Paschal Mystery and its salvific nature, this class presents Jesus as the culmination of Salvation History.  Students will study the need for humanity’s redemption and the suffering, death, and resurrection of Jesus as the means by which God affects our Salvation.  Students will also examine the moral and spiritual implications of redemption.

Semester 2: Ecclesiology: Students will study the Church as the Living Body of Christ and the Universal Sacrament of Salvation.  The Church’s divine and human elements will be explained and students will study the nature of the Church and its earthly structure (ecclesiology).  The course will also touch on major milestones in the history of the Church and its relationship to the modern world.

Theology 5-6

2 Semesters, 2 Credits Grades Available: 11

Semester 1: Sacramental Theology: This course explains basic sacramental theology and then examines in detail each of the seven sacraments in terms of their material signs, their form and liturgical expressions, and the graces conferred.  The course provides a Scriptural basis for each of the sacraments and explains both the required disposition of the recipient and the effects of the sacrament in the life of a believer.

Semester 2: Moral Theology: It is only in and through Christ that we have life and have it abundantly.  This course examines the path of decisions and actions that lead to this abundant life.  Students will study the nature of good and evil, the virtues, the types and effects of sin, the Commandments and Precepts of the Church.

Theology 7-8

2 Semesters, 2 Credits Grades Available: 12

Semester 1: Catholic Social Teaching: This course first examines the philosophical, historical, and scriptural foundation for Catholic Social Teaching.  Students then examine what is regarded as the Seven Themes of Catholic Social Teaching and apply these themes to a variety of social, political, and economic issues.

Semester 2: Christian Vocations: After examining the nature of vocation and the Universal Call to Holiness, the course provides the opportunity to study specific Christian vocations, namely Christian Marriage, Priesthood, and Religious Life.   This course will also introduce students to the process of discernment, formation, and fulfillment of the various states of life.

Chinese I

2 Semesters, 2 Credits Grades Available: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: C- average in previous English class.

Chinese I, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, introduces students to effective strategies for beginning Chinese language learning, and to various aspects of Chinese-speaking culture.  This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to basic requests and questions, understand and use appropriate greetings and forms of address, participate in brief guided conversations on familiar topics, and write simple sentences using characters.  This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as recognizing Chinese characters and sounds of familiar words and comprehending brief oral directions. Additionally, students will examine the practices, products, and perspectives of Chinese-speaking culture; recognize basic routine practices of the target culture, and recognize and use situation-appropriate non-verbal communication.  This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding Chinese language and culture outside of the classroom.

Chinese II

2 Semesters, 2 Credits Grades Available: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite:  C- average in Chinese I.                                                      

Chinese II, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for Chinese language learning by encouraging the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes.  This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to requests and questions in expanded contexts, participate independently in brief conversations on familiar topics, and write sentences and descriptions using characters. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using contextual clues to guess the meaning and recognizing words and characters through stroke order and stroke count.  Students will address the presentational mode by presenting prepared material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation. Additionally, students will describe the practices, products, and perspectives of Chinese-speaking culture; report on basic family and social practices of the target culture, and describe contributions from the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding Chinese language and culture outside of the classroom.

Latin I

2 Semesters, 2 Credits Grades Available: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite:  C- average in previous English class.

Latin I exposes students to the language, culture, and history of the Romans.  An introduction to the language through the Ecce Romani series emphasizes comprehension of the Latin language by reading it and studying the relevant grammar.  Through the study of Latin, the student will improve his or her knowledge of English vocabulary and grammar, understand the relationship of the ancient world to our modern society, and appreciate other foreign languages and cultures.

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